Four sharks spotted in False Bay in the past week

A Shark spotter on the look out for shark activity in Koggel Bay on the False Bay coast. File Picture Gabriel Ellison-Scowcroft.

A Shark spotter on the look out for shark activity in Koggel Bay on the False Bay coast. File Picture Gabriel Ellison-Scowcroft.

Published Dec 7, 2023

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Cape Town - With the warm summer days upon us and the holiday season approaching there have already been four confirmed reports of great white sharks in False Bay within the last week.

The Shark Advisory took to social media to warn water users to practise caution and advised to follow simple safety tips to reduce the risk of encountering a shark.

“The Shark Spotters at Muizenberg sighted a white shark on Monday 27th and Wednesday 29th November. On Saturday 2 December, spear fishermen at Smitswinkel Bay reported seeing a white shark and another white shark sighting was recorded off Roman Rock lighthouse by an experienced water user on the same day.”

“At this stage it is unclear whether these are sporadic, one-off sightings, or if this may signal the return of white sharks to False Bay in more numbers. In either event, we would like to remind water users to exercise caution whenever they enter the ocean and be aware that there may be more white shark activity in the bay than we have experienced in recent years.”

In an interview earlier this week Shark Spotters CEO Sarah Waries said the presence of the apex predators was important for the health of the False Bay coast line.

She said in 2015 they spotted around 250 sharks a year, but the number declined in 2017.

The Shark Advisory advised the public not to swim, surf or surf-ski when birds, dolphins or seals are feeding nearby and to obey beach rules if told to get out of the water.

For those who are kayaking or surf-skiing far out to sea, consider paddling in groups and staying close together and pay attention to any shark signage on beaches.

Do not swim, surf or surf-ski near where trek-netting, fishing or spear fishing is taking place or swim in deep water beyond the breakers.

If you are bleeding, avoid the water and do not swim, surf or surf-ski at night.

If you see a white shark please report it to the emergency services if it is close to water users and also report to Shark Spotters at https://sharkspotters.org.za/home/report-a-sighting/

Related Topics:

Marine EcologyAnimals